2020-04-27

Tips on Managing distributions

Blogs

How do you feel about spending thousands of dollars each month on something you donÍt need? I donÍt like it much, either. ThatÍs why I got rid of my companyÍs office in 2007 and never looked back. It wasnÍt easy. It took me years to get to that point mentally, but it was the right decision and being liberated from an office has provided big benefits in the years since. One benefit is being able to hire the best people regardless of where they live. We now have team members in Washington, Texas, Utah, Illinois, Arizona, and Hong Kong, and thatÍs just the full-timers. But managing a distributed team isnÍt without challenges. ItÍs easy to feel disconnected from others, run into communication problems with time zones, and when you add cultural differences into the mix things can get complicated quickly. Here are 7 ways weÍve learned to make overcome the challenges and turn not having an office into a net positive for our business. Focus on Results Managing a distributed team wonÍt work for every type of business, nor for every type of person. I run a digital marketing agency which might lend itself more easily to a distributed team model. The way we work isnÍt much different than how we would work if we were in an office together. What has been clear to me from day one, however, is that creating a results-only culture is key. We donÍt track employee work hours (although we do track project hours for billing and internal efficiency purposes) and offer unlimited vacation time. WeÍre also considering ñforcedî vacation time for those team members who are tempted to never go on vacation. The point is, we donÍt care what our team members are doing as long as theyÍre producing the results we do care about, and are able to produce those results on a sustained basis. This means stripping out arbitrary rules like a 40-hour work week or 2 weeks of vacation and saying ñWe donÍt care when you work or how you work, as long as you get the work done.î Then we strive for clarity as to what ñgetting the workî done means. Choose the right distribution channels As weÍve seen, not all methods work in all types of products or services distribution. The channels you choose should add value to the customer and improve their user experience. Where, when and how do they prefer to shop? What information, guidance or training do they need before they are persuaded? Adapt your channels to the customer, and don't expect this to work the other way around ? it never will. Apply business strategy Choosing a distribution channel means evaluating costs and profit margins, especially when intermediaries and third parties are involved. You should ensure that distribution is viable and can be carried out according to the terms agreed, with the possibility of scaling according to demand. The aims of, and benefits for, the company, distributors and customers should all be synchronised. Provide training Keeping up a good level of knowledge about the product or service within the company requires considerable effort, but it is also important to pass it on the other parties involved. Teach your intermediaries all they need to know about your products so that they can act as efficient salespeople and understand how to talk to consumers about the products. Adapt your channels to B2C and B2B B2C distribution channels are often longer and easier to determine, while a B2B strategy may require shorter steps, as the business comes into direct contact with other companies. However, the procurement process will be very different, perhaps slower or with requests for large volumes of merchandise. Standardize product information One of the main sources of problems between intermediaries and customers is when thereÍs a lack of product information thatÍs homogeneous and adequate for reference purposes. Your company should have an internal system, such as a Product Information Manager (PIM), that creates a source of integrity concerning the product data as included in each distribution channel. Only by using a PIM can you ensure all participants in a chain have the same up-to-date information, and that customers will always find the same data across all channels. Combine marketing and sales work The management of distribution channels is usually considered the responsibility of the company's marketing department, although the sales team can also participate in the marketing of a distribution channel. Sharing information is always beneficial and saves time in preparing the marketing of a distribution channel. For example, if the service or product being sold requires the involvement of more complex agents and contract signing processes, the role of your sales team will be important. On the other hand, if the sale is virtually direct, through online channels such as websites and apps, your product distribution marketing team will be able to automate more of the processes.

Tags: nan
2020-04-27

Tips on Managing distributions

Blogs

How do you feel about spending thousands of dollars each month on something you donÕt need? I donÕt like it much, either. ThatÕs why I got rid of my companyÕs office in 2007 and never looked back. It wasnÕt easy. It took me years to get to that point mentally, but it was the right decision and being liberated from an office has provided big benefits in the years since. One benefit is being able to hire the best people regardless of where they live. We now have team members in Washington, Texas, Utah, Illinois, Arizona, and Hong Kong, and thatÕs just the full-timers. But managing a distributed team isnÕt without challenges. ItÕs easy to feel disconnected from others, run into communication problems with time zones, and when you add cultural differences into the mix things can get complicated quickly. Here are 7 ways weÕve learned to make overcome the challenges and turn not having an office into a net positive for our business. Focus on Results Managing a distributed team wonÕt work for every type of business, nor for every type of person. I run a digital marketing agency which might lend itself more easily to a distributed team model. The way we work isnÕt much different than how we would work if we were in an office together. What has been clear to me from day one, however, is that creating a results-only culture is key. We donÕt track employee work hours (although we do track project hours for billing and internal efficiency purposes) and offer unlimited vacation time. WeÕre also considering ÒforcedÓ vacation time for those team members who are tempted to never go on vacation. The point is, we donÕt care what our team members are doing as long as theyÕre producing the results we do care about, and are able to produce those results on a sustained basis. This means stripping out arbitrary rules like a 40-hour work week or 2 weeks of vacation and saying ÒWe donÕt care when you work or how you work, as long as you get the work done.Ó Then we strive for clarity as to what Ògetting the workÓ done means. Choose the right distribution channels As weÕve seen, not all methods work in all types of products or services distribution. The channels you choose should add value to the customer and improve their user experience. Where, when and how do they prefer to shop? What information, guidance or training do they need before they are persuaded? Adapt your channels to the customer, and don't expect this to work the other way around Ð it never will. Apply business strategy Choosing a distribution channel means evaluating costs and profit margins, especially when intermediaries and third parties are involved. You should ensure that distribution is viable and can be carried out according to the terms agreed, with the possibility of scaling according to demand. The aims of, and benefits for, the company, distributors and customers should all be synchronised. Provide training Keeping up a good level of knowledge about the product or service within the company requires considerable effort, but it is also important to pass it on the other parties involved. Teach your intermediaries all they need to know about your products so that they can act as efficient salespeople and understand how to talk to consumers about the products. Adapt your channels to B2C and B2B B2C distribution channels are often longer and easier to determine, while a B2B strategy may require shorter steps, as the business comes into direct contact with other companies. However, the procurement process will be very different, perhaps slower or with requests for large volumes of merchandise. Standardize product information One of the main sources of problems between intermediaries and customers is when thereÕs a lack of product information thatÕs homogeneous and adequate for reference purposes. Your company should have an internal system, such as a Product Information Manager (PIM), that creates a source of integrity concerning the product data as included in each distribution channel. Only by using a PIM can you ensure all participants in a chain have the same up-to-date information, and that customers will always find the same data across all channels. Combine marketing and sales work The management of distribution channels is usually considered the responsibility of the company's marketing department, although the sales team can also participate in the marketing of a distribution channel. Sharing information is always beneficial and saves time in preparing the marketing of a distribution channel. For example, if the service or product being sold requires the involvement of more complex agents and contract signing processes, the role of your sales team will be important. On the other hand, if the sale is virtually direct, through online channels such as websites and apps, your product distribution marketing team will be able to automate more of the processes.

Tags: NA
2020-04-27

Tips on Managing distributions

Blogs

How do you feel about spending thousands of dollars each month on something you donÍt need? I donÍt like it much, either. ThatÍs why I got rid of my companyÍs office in 2007 and never looked back. It wasnÍt easy. It took me years to get to that point mentally, but it was the right decision and being liberated from an office has provided big benefits in the years since. One benefit is being able to hire the best people regardless of where they live. We now have team members in Washington, Texas, Utah, Illinois, Arizona, and Hong Kong, and thatÍs just the full-timers. But managing a distributed team isnÍt without challenges. ItÍs easy to feel disconnected from others, run into communication problems with time zones, and when you add cultural differences into the mix things can get complicated quickly. Here are 7 ways weÍve learned to make overcome the challenges and turn not having an office into a net positive for our business. Focus on Results Managing a distributed team wonÍt work for every type of business, nor for every type of person. I run a digital marketing agency which might lend itself more easily to a distributed team model. The way we work isnÍt much different than how we would work if we were in an office together. What has been clear to me from day one, however, is that creating a results-only culture is key. We donÍt track employee work hours (although we do track project hours for billing and internal efficiency purposes) and offer unlimited vacation time. WeÍre also considering ñforcedî vacation time for those team members who are tempted to never go on vacation. The point is, we donÍt care what our team members are doing as long as theyÍre producing the results we do care about, and are able to produce those results on a sustained basis. This means stripping out arbitrary rules like a 40-hour work week or 2 weeks of vacation and saying ñWe donÍt care when you work or how you work, as long as you get the work done.î Then we strive for clarity as to what ñgetting the workî done means. Choose the right distribution channels As weÍve seen, not all methods work in all types of products or services distribution. The channels you choose should add value to the customer and improve their user experience. Where, when and how do they prefer to shop? What information, guidance or training do they need before they are persuaded? Adapt your channels to the customer, and don't expect this to work the other way around ? it never will. Apply business strategy Choosing a distribution channel means evaluating costs and profit margins, especially when intermediaries and third parties are involved. You should ensure that distribution is viable and can be carried out according to the terms agreed, with the possibility of scaling according to demand. The aims of, and benefits for, the company, distributors and customers should all be synchronised. Provide training Keeping up a good level of knowledge about the product or service within the company requires considerable effort, but it is also important to pass it on the other parties involved. Teach your intermediaries all they need to know about your products so that they can act as efficient salespeople and understand how to talk to consumers about the products. Adapt your channels to B2C and B2B B2C distribution channels are often longer and easier to determine, while a B2B strategy may require shorter steps, as the business comes into direct contact with other companies. However, the procurement process will be very different, perhaps slower or with requests for large volumes of merchandise. Standardize product information One of the main sources of problems between intermediaries and customers is when thereÍs a lack of product information thatÍs homogeneous and adequate for reference purposes. Your company should have an internal system, such as a Product Information Manager (PIM), that creates a source of integrity concerning the product data as included in each distribution channel. Only by using a PIM can you ensure all participants in a chain have the same up-to-date information, and that customers will always find the same data across all channels. Combine marketing and sales work The management of distribution channels is usually considered the responsibility of the company's marketing department, although the sales team can also participate in the marketing of a distribution channel. Sharing information is always beneficial and saves time in preparing the marketing of a distribution channel. For example, if the service or product being sold requires the involvement of more complex agents and contract signing processes, the role of your sales team will be important. On the other hand, if the sale is virtually direct, through online channels such as websites and apps, your product distribution marketing team will be able to automate more of the processes.

Tags: nan
2020-04-27

Tips on Managing distributions

Blogs

How do you feel about spending thousands of dollars each month on something you donÕt need? I donÕt like it much, either. ThatÕs why I got rid of my companyÕs office in 2007 and never looked back. It wasnÕt easy. It took me years to get to that point mentally, but it was the right decision and being liberated from an office has provided big benefits in the years since. One benefit is being able to hire the best people regardless of where they live. We now have team members in Washington, Texas, Utah, Illinois, Arizona, and Hong Kong, and thatÕs just the full-timers. But managing a distributed team isnÕt without challenges. ItÕs easy to feel disconnected from others, run into communication problems with time zones, and when you add cultural differences into the mix things can get complicated quickly. Here are 7 ways weÕve learned to make overcome the challenges and turn not having an office into a net positive for our business. Focus on Results Managing a distributed team wonÕt work for every type of business, nor for every type of person. I run a digital marketing agency which might lend itself more easily to a distributed team model. The way we work isnÕt much different than how we would work if we were in an office together. What has been clear to me from day one, however, is that creating a results-only culture is key. We donÕt track employee work hours (although we do track project hours for billing and internal efficiency purposes) and offer unlimited vacation time. WeÕre also considering ÒforcedÓ vacation time for those team members who are tempted to never go on vacation. The point is, we donÕt care what our team members are doing as long as theyÕre producing the results we do care about, and are able to produce those results on a sustained basis. This means stripping out arbitrary rules like a 40-hour work week or 2 weeks of vacation and saying ÒWe donÕt care when you work or how you work, as long as you get the work done.Ó Then we strive for clarity as to what Ògetting the workÓ done means. Choose the right distribution channels As weÕve seen, not all methods work in all types of products or services distribution. The channels you choose should add value to the customer and improve their user experience. Where, when and how do they prefer to shop? What information, guidance or training do they need before they are persuaded? Adapt your channels to the customer, and don't expect this to work the other way around Ð it never will. Apply business strategy Choosing a distribution channel means evaluating costs and profit margins, especially when intermediaries and third parties are involved. You should ensure that distribution is viable and can be carried out according to the terms agreed, with the possibility of scaling according to demand. The aims of, and benefits for, the company, distributors and customers should all be synchronised. Provide training Keeping up a good level of knowledge about the product or service within the company requires considerable effort, but it is also important to pass it on the other parties involved. Teach your intermediaries all they need to know about your products so that they can act as efficient salespeople and understand how to talk to consumers about the products. Adapt your channels to B2C and B2B B2C distribution channels are often longer and easier to determine, while a B2B strategy may require shorter steps, as the business comes into direct contact with other companies. However, the procurement process will be very different, perhaps slower or with requests for large volumes of merchandise. Standardize product information One of the main sources of problems between intermediaries and customers is when thereÕs a lack of product information thatÕs homogeneous and adequate for reference purposes. Your company should have an internal system, such as a Product Information Manager (PIM), that creates a source of integrity concerning the product data as included in each distribution channel. Only by using a PIM can you ensure all participants in a chain have the same up-to-date information, and that customers will always find the same data across all channels. Combine marketing and sales work The management of distribution channels is usually considered the responsibility of the company's marketing department, although the sales team can also participate in the marketing of a distribution channel. Sharing information is always beneficial and saves time in preparing the marketing of a distribution channel. For example, if the service or product being sold requires the involvement of more complex agents and contract signing processes, the role of your sales team will be important. On the other hand, if the sale is virtually direct, through online channels such as websites and apps, your product distribution marketing team will be able to automate more of the processes.

Tags: NA